Jess Carpenter

Some fun Homework

This painting I created as a final project for my favorite Masters Class in Creative Leadership and Problem Solving: I use symbols to describe my leadership style. I went all out abstract! This explanation comes with it.

This painting is using symbolism for theories and how I combine visionary leadership, with Flow, Divergent thinking, and Foresight.
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To begin with, the Foresight Preferences to show that I am a leader that want to help my followers find out who they are and how to use their skills to the best of their ability.
Those are the four symbols with myself in the middle. Classifier, Indicator, (Leader) Developer, and the Implementer

The symbolical thought bubble which we all share is my “Vision.”
I would like to think of myself as a visionary leader with a visionary thinking style in. 


The image is also showing that not only am I sharing my vision with the followers but I am fostering them to feel as if they are a part of the Vision.
If they feel they have a role in achieving the vision, this will help foster an environment for “Flow.”

The culture of the staff is based on flow as the reward and goal. That is the intertwined energy sources “Flowing.” The environment would need to be able to support the Flow environment.

Our culture is to make working fun and creative, this will drive you, motivation and skill being stretched in a supportive environment is the recipe for success, and this is accomplished with the use of divergent and convergent problem-solving.

The two circles with the smaller colored waves is a visualization for Divergent thinking and the collection of mass ideas and filtering through the Convergent circle to get to the most Novel solution.

Creating flow through employees knowing their skills and stretching them to achieve more of the feeling of flow and achievement.

Thoughts

You are the books you read, the films you watch, the music you listen to, the people you meet, the dreams you have, the conversations you engage in. You are what you take from these. You are the sound of the ocean, the breath of fresh air, the brightest light and the darkest corner.

Gary Cohn a Dyslexic

by Jess Carpenter

gary-cohn-6A teacher once told Gary Cohn’s parents that if they were lucky, he might grow up to be a truck driver.

“I was a horrible student,” Cohn, the president and COO of Goldman Sachs, told a room full of teachers.

On Thursday night, Cohn was honored at Teach For America’s Annual New York City Benefit Dinner held at the Waldorf-Astoria.

“I know from my experiences in life that educators had an enormous impact and influence on me,” he said. “And fortunately or unfortunately, I had a lot of experience with different educators.”

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/gary-cohn-honored-by-teach-for-america-2015-4#ixzz3Y9CupQZz

Dyslexia and Business Acumen

by Jess Carpenter

The data is hard to believe:

It has long been known that dyslexics are drawn to running their own businesses, where they can get around their weaknesses in reading and writing and play on their strengths. But a new study of entrepreneurs in the United States suggests that dyslexia is much more common among small-business owners than even the experts had thought.The report, compiled by Julie Logan, a professor of entrepreneurship at the Cass Business School in London, found that more than a third of the entrepreneurs she had surveyed — 35 percent — identified themselves as dyslexic. The study also concluded that dyslexics were more likely than nondyslexics to delegate authority, to excel in oral communication and problem solving and were twice as likely to own two or more businesses.

Keep in mind that only 10 percent of Americans are believed to have dyslexia, so the percentage of business owners with dyslexia is a very significant aberration. The explanation seems to be that children with dyslexia develop compensatory mechanisms that allow them to excel in business. They turn a potential disability into a new set of cognitive skills.

One reason that dyslexics are drawn to entrepreneurship, Professor Logan said, is that strategies they have used since childhood to offset their weaknesses in written communication and organizational ability — identifying trustworthy people and handing over major responsibilities to them — can be applied to businesses.”The willingness to delegate authority gives them a significant advantage over nondyslexic entrepreneurs, who tend to view their business as their baby and like to be in total control,” she said.

 

The larger moral of studies like this is that we should never underestimate the importance of neurodiversity. At first glance, dyslexia might seem like an unequivocal disability, a brain disorder that we’d be better off without. But nothing in the mind is that simple, is it?